Author Interview with Jim Newheiser

This week’s author inter­view is with Jim Newheiser. He is the author of Par­ent­ing Is More than a For­mula and the co-author of You Never Stop Being a Par­ent: Thriv­ing in Rela­tion­ship with Your Adult Chil­dren.

Newheiser_Jim

  • Ques­tion #1 — Tell us a lit­tle bit about your­self: where you’re from, fam­ily, job, per­sonal inter­ests, unique hob­bies, what you do in your spare time, etc.

I con­sider myself a Texan, and I deter­mined as a young man to live there for the rest of my life. In God’s prov­i­dence, early in our mar­riage we went to Saudi Ara­bia for six years dur­ing which time I was a tent­mak­ing pas­tor in an under­ground church for expa­tri­ates, fol­lowed by the past twenty-seven years in South­ern Cal­i­for­nia dur­ing which time I went to sem­i­nary, helped to plant our local church and then became involved in bib­li­cal counseling.

My main hobby is run­ning long dis­tances slowly (marathons and ultramarathons).

 

  • Ques­tion #2 — When did you first want to write a book?

Until Elyse Fitz­patrick invited me to co-author a book with her about ten years ago, it never occurred to me that I would ever write a book. As God used that book to help oth­ers, I had a bur­den to write about other top­ics and the Lord opened doors to make this possible.

 

  • Ques­tion #3 — Have you always enjoyed writing?

I find writ­ing to be extremely dif­fi­cult, but I try to have an escha­to­log­i­cal per­spec­tive, antic­i­pat­ing future joy as oth­ers are helped by what the Lord has been teach­ing me.

 

  • Ques­tion #4 — What inspired you to write this book, about this topic?

I wrote Par­ent­ing Is More than a For­mula to speak to par­ents who have been hurt and dis­cour­aged as they have tried to dis­cover the per­fect for­mula by which they can ensure that their chil­dren will turn out well. Many of the par­ent­ing method­olo­gies being offered to the Chris­t­ian com­mu­nity are legal­is­tic. They go beyond what Scrip­ture requires of par­ents (which is actu­ally quite simple—discipline, instruc­tion and not pro­vok­ing their chil­dren to anger Eph. 6:4) and present a method­ol­ogy (which may be one of many pos­si­ble ways to imple­ment what the Bible teaches) that they imply is God’s way of par­ent­ing. They also imply that those who don’t fol­low their method­ol­ogy are in sin. This leads to my sec­ond major con­cern which is that many par­ent­ing for­mu­las sound unbib­li­cally deter­min­is­tic, imply­ing that par­ent­ing is like bak­ing a cake in that if you fol­low the right recipe you will expe­ri­ence the right out­come. While Scrip­ture teaches that par­ents are an impor­tant influ­ence on how their chil­dren turn out (Prov. 29:15), we can­not con­trol out­comes (see Ezekiel 18). We expose our chil­dren to God’s grace and wis­dom, but they can choose to reject what we teach. Ulti­mately we par­ents are depen­dent upon God’s grace.

 

  • Ques­tion #5 — Do you have a spe­cific spot where you enjoy writ­ing most?

We have some dear friends who allow us to use their apart­ment over­look­ing the beach in San Clemente, which is where I have been doing most of my writ­ing in recent years. It is great to get away from our nor­mal envi­ron­ment and to expe­ri­ence the beauty of God’s cre­ation as I do the hard work of writing.

 

  • Ques­tion #6 — Favorite food?

Any­thing my wife cooks.

 

  • Ques­tion #7 — Favorite fla­vor of ice cream?

Any­thing made by Blue Bell, which trag­i­cally is not sold in California.

 

  • Ques­tion #8 — Favorite ani­mal? Why?

Dog. Loyal and eager to please.

 

  • Ques­tion #9 — If you have a favorite book of the Bible, what is it and why?

What­ever book I am cur­rently study­ing and preaching.

 


Want to learn more about Jim? He is the direc­tor and coun­selor of the Insti­tute for Bib­li­cal Coun­sel­ing & Discipleship.


 

Author Interview with Jane Roach

This week’s author inter­view is with Jane Roach, the author of our new book, Joy beyond Agony: Embrac­ing the Cross of Christ, A Twelve-Lesson Bible Study.

 

Roach_Jane

  • Ques­tion #1 — Tell us a lit­tle bit about your­self: where you’re from, fam­ily, job, per­sonal inter­ests, unique hob­bies, what you do in your spare time, etc.

I am a native of San Anto­nio, Texas. My par­ents were hard work­ing, self-denying peo­ple who brought me up in the nur­ture and admo­ni­tion of the Lord. My older sis­ter is with the Lord and my twin sis­ter is close to me in body and soul. I am mar­ried for almost 50 years to Jim Roach. We have one daugh­ter and one son, four grand­sons, two grand­daugh­ters, and another grand­son due in August this year.

I taught math­e­mat­ics at San Anto­nio Com­mu­nity Col­lege for three years and at Texas State Uni­ver­sity, San Mar­cos TX, for three years before the birth of my daugh­ter. My desires changed as I began to study the Bible in 1974. I “grew up” in the Lord in Bible Study Fel­low­ship, teach­ing a class of 450 women for 7 years before join­ing the global head­quar­ters staff in 1985 as Direc­tor of Train­ing. I retired from that posi­tion in 2011. Since then I have been teach­ing two Bible stud­ies in my com­mu­nity and church. The lessons from one of the stud­ies is the basis for Joy beyond Agony: Embrac­ing the Cross of Christ.

I enjoy play­ing the piano, singing in the church choir, and going to the per­for­mances of the San Anto­nio Sym­phony. For times of rest, I do counted cross stitch embroi­dery. Dis­cov­er­ing and try­ing new recipes has always been fun for me.

I am a big fan of the San Anto­nio Spurs NBA bas­ket­ball team. Go Spurs Go!

 

  • Ques­tion #2 — Which writ­ers inspire you?

R. C. Sproul, D. A. Car­son, and Elis­a­beth Elliot have been favorites for many years. I enjoy read­ing biogra­phies of Chris­tians and non-Christians. I find them very stretch­ing and chal­leng­ing. My favorites include: A Chance to Die: The Life and Legacy of Amy Carmichael, Shadow of the Almighty: The Life and Tes­ta­ment of Jim Elliot, and Evi­dence Not Seen: A Woman’s Mirac­u­lous Faith in the Jun­gles of World War II (Dar­lene Deibler Rose).

 

  • Ques­tion #3 — What inspired you to write Joy beyond Agony?

One of my col­leagues at BSF, Shirley Mills, fre­quently told me I should write a book about the Cross. Just before I retired, two godly men I respect, Dr. John Han­nah and Dr. Thomas Schreiner, gave me the same admo­ni­tion. I real­ized I must give their com­ments seri­ous con­sid­er­a­tion. As I did, I began to have a desire to per­se­vere to write. It has been a glo­ri­ous experience.

 

  • Ques­tion #4 — Do you have a spe­cific spot where you enjoy writ­ing most?

I have an office in my home, with an iMac that I enjoy using.

 

  • Ques­tion #5 — At what time of day do you write most?

Early in the morning.

 

  • Ques­tion #6 — How do you deal with writer’s block?

I get up, walk around, do some mind­less task and pray while I am doing it. Some­times I ask my hus­band or a friend to let me tell them about the place where I am stuck. As I talk about it, often it becomes clear to me how to move forward.

 

  • Ques­tion #7 — Favorite sport to watch? Why?  Favorite sport’s team?

NBA bas­ket­ball. I like is because it is fast mov­ing. My favorite sport’s team is the San Anto­nio Spurs.

 

  • Ques­tion #8 — Favorite fla­vor of ice cream?

Blue Bell Coconut Fudge (it tastes like Mounds, my favorite candy bar.)

 

  • Ques­tion #9 — If you have a favorite book of the Bible, what is it and why?

Romans; I like Paul’s antic­i­pa­tion of ques­tions and his lin­ear arguments.

 


Want to learn more about Jane?


 

Author Interview with Gary Steward

This week’s author inter­view is with Gary Stew­ard. He is the author of Prince­ton Sem­i­nary (1812–1929): Its Lead­ers’ Lives and Works.

Steward_Gary

  • Ques­tion #1 — Tell us a lit­tle bit about your­self: where you’re from, fam­ily, job, per­sonal inter­ests, unique hob­bies, what you do in your spare time, etc.

I grew up in a Chris­t­ian home and was raised on a farm in South Dakota. I met my wife Amy while I was an appren­tice at Beth­le­hem Bap­tist Church in Min­neapo­lis. We spent seven years of our lives together in St. John’s, New­found­land, Canada, where I served as a pas­tor. Our three chil­dren were born in Canada, so they like to say that they are “Camer­i­can.” Right now, I am fin­ish­ing my PhD in Church His­tory and His­tor­i­cal The­ol­ogy and will soon be mov­ing to Lake­wood, Col­orado, where I’ve just been hired as a pro­fes­sor of his­tory at Col­orado Chris­t­ian Uni­ver­sity. When I’m not think­ing about my dis­ser­ta­tion topic (the Amer­i­can Rev­o­lu­tion and the Amer­i­can clergy’s involve­ment in it), I like to read and spend time with my family.

 

  • Ques­tion #2 — Which writ­ers inspire you?

I dis­cov­ered the writ­ings of J. I. Packer, Iain Mur­ray, John Piper, R. C. Sproul, and Mar­tyn Lloyd-Jones while I was a stu­dent at South Dakota State Uni­ver­sity. I owe the whole ori­en­ta­tion of my the­ol­ogy, as well as my love of church his­tory and Chris­t­ian biog­ra­phy, to these writ­ers. The one writer that has inspired me the most has been Iain Mur­ray. His books blend his­tory, the­ol­ogy, biog­ra­phy, and devo­tion together in a way that is both spir­i­tu­ally rich and the­o­log­i­cally instructive.

 

  • Ques­tion #3 — What inspired you to write this book, about this topic?

Read­ing the pub­lished let­ters of J. W. Alexan­der opened my eyes to the whole world of Old Prince­ton. Through read­ing his let­ters, I saw the world of nine­teenth cen­tury Amer­ica through the eyes of a Prince­ton the­olo­gian. I was fas­ci­nated by Alexander’s inter­ac­tion with the world around him and by his attempts to apply his the­ol­ogy to the burn­ing social, polit­i­cal, and eccle­si­as­ti­cal issues of his day.

 

  • Ques­tion #4 — What book are you read­ing now?

I’ve recently been read­ing The Future of His­tory by John Lukacs and a text­book on West­ern Civ­i­liza­tion by Mar­vin Perry et al. I’m also read­ing The Hob­bit to my girls while they wash dishes in the evenings.

 

  • Ques­tion #5 — Favorite food?

I really enjoy good Indian food. It’s hard to beat but­ter chicken, chana masala, and samosas!

 

  • Ques­tion #6 — If you have a favorite book of the Bible, what is it and why?

My favorite book of the Bible is Romans. I love Paul’s pre­sen­ta­tion of the gospel and of God’s sov­er­eign grace. Romans never grows old to me.


 

Author Interview with Bryan Gregory

This week’s author inter­view is with Bryan Gre­gory. He is the author of Long­ing for God in an Age of Dis­cour­age­ment: The Gospel Accord­ing to Zechariah and Incon­spic­u­ous Prov­i­dence: The Gospel Accord­ing to Esther. Both of these books are part of the Gospel Accord­ing to the Old Tes­ta­ment series.

Gregory, Bryan

 

  • Ques­tion #1 — Tell us a lit­tle bit about your­self: where you’re from, fam­ily, job, per­sonal inter­ests, unique hob­bies, what you do in your spare time, etc.

I’m orig­i­nally from Vir­ginia but live in Mis­souri now. I have a wife, Christy, who is from Cal­i­for­nia. We met in Yel­low­stone National Park and have a “hobby” of going to a national park every fall to hike. We have two boys, Joshua and Noah.

 

  • Ques­tion #2 — What inspired you to write this book, about this topic? 

My book on Zechariah (Long­ing for God in an Age of Dis­cour­age­ment) grew out of an Advent ser­mon series. Sev­eral of the GAOT books were already out and the book of Zechariah seemed to hold real promise for what the series was try­ing to accom­plish. My book on Esther (Incon­spic­u­ous Prov­i­dence) also grew out of a ser­mon series, though sev­eral years after the series was preached. Sev­eral peo­ple kept encour­ag­ing me to rework the ser­mon man­u­scripts into a book.

 

  • Ques­tion #3 — Other than the Bible, do you have a favorite book?

Among fic­tion books, my favorites are My Name is Asher Lev (Chaim Potok), The Power and the Glory (Gra­ham Greene), and The Diary of a Coun­try Priest (Georges Bernanos). As for non-fiction books, it would be too hard to nar­row down.

 

  • Ques­tion #4 — Do you have a favorite quote? What is it and why?

Karl Barth once said, “Only God can preach.” By that he meant that preach­ing really only hap­pens when God speaks into a heart. As preach­ers, we preach but it only becomes preach­ing when God him­self accom­pa­nies the words to make them effec­tive within peo­ple. As some­one who is pri­mar­ily a pas­tor that per­spec­tive is both empow­er­ing and liberating.

 


Visit his church’s web­site: http://www.brookdalechurch.com/


 

Author Interview with John Frame

This week’s author inter­view is with John Frame. He is the author of the fol­low­ing 14 P&R titles includ­ing the A The­ol­ogy of Lord­ship series and Sys­tem­atic The­ol­ogy: An Intro­duc­tion to Chris­t­ian Belief.

Frame, John

  • Ques­tion #1 — Tell us a lit­tle bit about your­self: where you’re from, fam­ily, job, per­sonal inter­ests, unique hob­bies, what you do in your spare time, etc.

I was born in Pitts­burgh in 1939. Dad was a labor nego­tia­tor with West­ing­house Elec­tric, Mom a home­maker. Old­est of four sib­lings. In my early teens, God led me to fol­low Jesus. I’ve taught the­ol­ogy since 1968, first at Westminster/Phila (1968–80), then at Westminster/California (1980–2000), and since then at Reformed The­o­log­i­cal Sem­i­nary in Orlando, FL. I’m a “teach­ing elder” in Cen­tral Florida Pres­bytery of the Pres­by­ter­ian Church of Amer­ica. I have been a church pianist, organ­ist, wor­ship leader and choir direc­tor from time to time. My wife Mary and I have five chil­dren. My spare time is mostly spent in writ­ing books and arti­cles, but I enjoy films and news media.

 

  • Ques­tion #2 — When did you first want to write a book?

In the 1970s I pro­duced a lot of lec­ture out­lines and study guides for the courses I taught. Releas­ing these in book form seemed like the next log­i­cal step. A num­ber of peo­ple, includ­ing some at P&R, encour­aged me, and my The Doc­trine of the Knowl­edge of God appeared in 1987. But through­out my adult life I have felt that the­o­log­i­cal books are an impor­tant min­istry. It was the books of Van Til, Mur­ray, and Young that led me to study at West­min­ster in 1961.

 

  • Ques­tion #3 — Which writ­ers inspire you?

Abra­ham Kuyper, Her­man Bavinck, B. B. Warfield, J. Gre­sham Machen, C. S. Lewis, Cor­nelius Van Til, John Mur­ray, Vern Poythress.

 

  • Ques­tion #4 — Have you always enjoyed writing?

Yes, since high school or so. Of course, writ­ing is hard work. But com­plet­ing a book and see­ing it released is one of my great­est pleasures.

 

  • Ques­tion #5 — What inspired you to write your upcom­ing book, His­tory of West­ern Phi­los­o­phy and Theology?

Like most of my books, His­tory of West­ern Phi­los­o­phy and The­ol­ogy is an expan­sion of my course lec­tures. I felt a need for a book that treated the sub­ject com­pre­hen­sively and with an explic­itly Chris­t­ian evaluation.

 

  • Ques­tion #6 — Do you have a spe­cific spot where you enjoy writ­ing most?

In front of my office computer.

 

  • Ques­tion #7 — What book are you read­ing now?

Peter Jones, The Other World­view, to be pub­lished by Lex­ham Press.

 

  • Ques­tion #8 — Other than the Bible, do you have a favorite book?

Gre­sham Machen, Chris­tian­ity and Liberalism.

 

  • Ques­tion #9 — Favorite food?

Lob­ster.

 

  • Ques­tion #10 — Favorite fla­vor of ice cream?

Pis­ta­chio.

 

  • Ques­tion #11 — Favorite animal?

Welsh Corgi dog (we’ve had sev­eral as pets over the years.)

 

  • Ques­tion #12 — If you have a favorite book of the Bible, what is it and why?

First Corinthi­ans: it deals with many sub­jects I’m inter­ested in: epis­te­mol­ogy, church dis­ci­pline, ethics, wor­ship, apologetics.


 P&R titles by John Frame:

A Theology of Lordship Series


Want to learn more about John Frame?