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The Legacy of John Calvin

His Influence on the Modern World


Direct Price: $12.99 $10.00
Format: Paperback, eBook
Pages: 112
ISBN: 9781596380851

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About

David Hall identifies ten seminal ways that Calvin's thought transformed the culture of the West, complete with a nontechnical biography of Calvin and tributes by other leaders. The Legacy of John Calvin is brief enough for popular audiences and analytical enough to provide much information in a short space.

Endorsements

"This gem of a book is the perfect introduction to John Calvin on the 500th anniversary of his birth. Typical errors and caricatures are gently debunked. More importantly, David Hall shows us how so many of the blessings of modern life we take for granted are the legacy of the Genevan reformation. . . . Most of all, in this marvelous book Calvin’s humanity is revealed; he even becomes our friend."

—William Edgar

"David Hall has gifted us with an innovative, succinct book on John Calvin and his influence on church and society in everything from education and benevolent assistance to politics and economics. . . . Some sections, such as Hall's description of Calvin's humility, are the finest I’ve read in all of Calvin literature. For a quick yet informative read about Calvin and his massive influence in the church and the world, this is the book."

—Joel R. Beeke

"David W. Hall makes many bold claims about the influence of John Calvin . . . and then provides the evidence to back up those claims. As a pastor who has read widely and deeply on his subject, Dr. Hall provides a positive appreciation of Calvin's life and influence for those celebrating the 500th anniversary of his birth."

—William S. Barker


The Author

David W. Hall

David W. Hall

David W. Hall was senior pastor of Midway Presbyterian Church in Powder Springs, Georgia, from 2003 to 2008. He founded the Kuyper Institute and the Center for the Advancement of Paleo-Orthodoxy in Oak Ridge, Tennessee, in 1994.